Lindsay Crawford


Lindsay Crawford

Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Joined Connecticut College: 2015

Education
B.A., Mount Holyoke College
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley


Specializations

Epistemology

Metaethics

History of philosophy

Lindsay Crawford joined the faculty in 2015 as a C3 Postdoctoral Fellow in Philosophy. She specializes primarily in epistemology and metaethics, and has serious secondary interests in the history of philosophy.

Much of her current research aims to make sense of what we mean when we make claims about what people ought to believe (e.g., “People ought to believe that climate change is real,” or “You ought to take his medical advice with a ‘grain of salt.’”) Can such claims be true, if we by and large do not have any direct control over what we believe? If these claims can be true, what makes them true?

She has also recently started working on the topic of epistemic injustice: the idea that one can wrong another person by not according that person’s word sufficient credibility, owing in part to an identity prejudice against that person. She looks forward to developing this work further in a senior seminar on epistemic injustice at Connecticut College in Spring 2016.

She recently completed her Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, where she taught courses in the history of philosophy, aesthetics, moral philosophy, and epistemology. In 2013, she won the Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award, as well as the Teaching Effectiveness Award.

She received her B.A. in philosophy (summa cum laude) from Mount Holyoke College. She is very excited to return to the liberal arts college environment where she first became exposed to -- and scandalized by -- philosophical views.

In Fall 2015, Lindsay taught a course on the philosophy of David Hume.

Majoring in Philosophy.

Visit the philosophy department website. 

Contact Lindsay Crawford

Mailing Address

Lindsay Crawford
Connecticut College
Box #5312
270 Mohegan Ave.
New London, CT 06320

Office

Blaustein Humanities 302